Carlos Sierra's Tools and Tips

Tools and Tips for Oracle Performance and SQL Tuning

Archive for the ‘Health-Checks’ Category

eDB360 includes now an optional staging repository

with 3 comments

eDB360 has always worked under the premise “no installation required”, and still is the case today – it is part of its fundamental essence: give me a 360-degree view of my Oracle database with no installation whatsoever. With that in mind, this free tool helps sites that have gone to the cloud, as well as those with “on-premises” databases; and in both cases not installing anything certainly expedites diagnostics collections. With eDB360, you simply connect to SQL*Plus with an account that can select from the catalog, execute then a set of scripts behind eDB360 and bingo!, you get to understand what is going on with your database just by navigating the html output. With such functionality, we can remotely diagnose a database, and even elaborate on the full health-check of it. After all, that is how we successfully use it every day!, saving us hundreds of hours of metadata gathering and cross-reference analysis.

Starting with release v1706, eDB360 also supports an optional staging repository of the 26 AWR views listed below. Why? the answer is simple: improved performance! This can be quite significant on large databases with hundreds of active sessions, with frequent snapshots, or with a long history on AWR. We have seen cases where years of data are “stuck” on AWR, specially in older releases of the database. Of course cleaning up the outdated AWR history (and corresponding statistics) is highly recommended, but in the meantime trying to execute edb360 on such databases may lead to long execution hours and frustration, taking sometimes days for what should take only a few hours.

  1. dba_hist_active_sess_history
  2. dba_hist_database_instance
  3. dba_hist_event_histogram
  4. dba_hist_ic_client_stats
  5. dba_hist_ic_device_stats
  6. dba_hist_interconnect_pings
  7. dba_hist_memory_resize_ops
  8. dba_hist_memory_target_advice
  9. dba_hist_osstat
  10. dba_hist_parameter
  11. dba_hist_pgastat
  12. dba_hist_resource_limit
  13. dba_hist_service_name
  14. dba_hist_sga
  15. dba_hist_sgastat
  16. dba_hist_sql_plan
  17. dba_hist_sqlstat
  18. dba_hist_sqltext
  19. dba_hist_sys_time_model
  20. dba_hist_sysmetric_history
  21. dba_hist_sysmetric_summary
  22. dba_hist_sysstat
  23. dba_hist_system_event
  24. dba_hist_tbspc_space_usage
  25. dba_hist_wr_control
  26. dba_hist_snapshot

Thus, if you are contemplating executing eDB360 on a large database, and provided pre-check script edb360-master/sql/awr_ash_pre_check.sql shows that eDB360 might take over 24 hours, then while you clean up your AWR repository you can use the eDB360 staging repository as a workaround to speedup eDB360 execution. The use of this optional staging repository is very simple, just look inside the edb360-master/repo directory for instructions. And as always, shoot me an email or comment here if there were any questions.

Written by Carlos Sierra

February 19, 2017 at 8:43 pm

Discovering if a System level Parameter has changed its value (and when it happened)

with 4 comments

Quite often I learn of a system where “nobody changed anything” and suddenly the system is experiencing some strange behavior. Then after diligent investigation it turns out someone changed a little parameter at the System level, but somehow disregarded mentioning it since he/she thought it had no connection to the unexpected behavior.  As we all know, System parameters are big knobs that we don’t change lightly, still we often see “unknown” changes like the one described.

Script below produces a list of changes to System parameter values, indicating when a parameter was changed and from which value into which value. It does not filter out cache re-sizing operations, or resource manager plan changes. Both would be easy to exclude, but I’d rather see those global changes listed as well.

Note: This script below should only be executed if your site has a license for the Oracle Diagnostics pack (or Tuning pack), since it reads from AWR.

WITH
all_parameters AS (
SELECT snap_id,
       dbid,
       instance_number,
       parameter_name,
       value,
       isdefault,
       ismodified,
       lag(value) OVER (PARTITION BY dbid, instance_number, parameter_hash ORDER BY snap_id) prior_value
  FROM dba_hist_parameter
)
SELECT TO_CHAR(s.begin_interval_time, 'YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI') begin_time,
       TO_CHAR(s.end_interval_time, 'YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI') end_time,
       p.snap_id,
       p.dbid,
       p.instance_number,
       p.parameter_name,
       p.value,
       p.isdefault,
       p.ismodified,
       p.prior_value
  FROM all_parameters p,
       dba_hist_snapshot s
 WHERE p.value != p.prior_value
   AND s.snap_id = p.snap_id
   AND s.dbid = p.dbid
   AND s.instance_number = p.instance_number
 ORDER BY
       s.begin_interval_time DESC,
       p.dbid,
       p.instance_number,
       p.parameter_name
/

Sample output follows, where we can see a parameter affecting Degree of Parallelism was changed. This is just to illustrate its use. Enjoy this new free script! It is now part of edb360.
Screen Shot 2015-03-25 at 19.15.26

Written by Carlos Sierra

March 25, 2015 at 7:25 pm

eDB360

with 23 comments

Enkitec’s Oracle Database 360-degree View

eDB360_206_135_csEDB360 is a free tool that executes on an Oracle database and produces a compressed file which includes a large set of small Reports. This set of Reports provides a 360-degree view of an Oracle Database. EDB360 is mostly used for one of the following 3 reasons, listed here in order of frequency of use: 1) Keystone of an Oracle database Health-Check. 2) Kick-off for an Oracle database Performance Evaluation. 3) High-level view of System Resources demand and utilization for an Oracle database Sizing and Provisioning project.

Usually, Developers, Sys Admins and Consultants are not given open access to a database in a Production environment. This eDB360 free tool helps approved users to become familiar with an Oracle database in a non-intrusive way. Without installing anything on the database, the eDB360 tool connects to an Oracle database and produces a large set of flat files that can be reviewed offline while using an HTML browser or a Text editor.

EDB360 can be executed by someone with very limited access to an Oracle database (i.e. a Developer, Sys Admin or Consultant with just query access to the Data Dictionary views); or if executed by an authorized DBA, there is no actual need to provide any additional access to the Oracle database to the party requesting eDB360.

EDB360 works on 10gR2, 11gR2, and on higher releases of Oracle; and it can be used on Linux or UNIX Platforms. It has not been tested on Windows. An eDB360 sample output is available at this Dropbox location; after downloading the sample output, look for the 0001_edb360_dbname_index.html file and start browsing.

Instructions

Download the eDB360 tool and review the readme.txt file included. Uncompress the eDB360 master ZIP file on the Database Server of interest. Navigate to the main eDB360 (master) directory and execute script edb360.sql connected as SYS or any other account with access to the Data Dictionary views (a DBA account is not required but it is preferred).

Execution time for eDB360 may exceed 1 hour, depending on the size of the Data Dictionary. And the size of the output may reach 1 GB, so be sure you execute this tool from a file system directory with at least 1 GB or free space. Common sizes of the output range between 10 and 100 MB.

EDB360 has only one execution parameter:

  1. Oracle Pack License: A big portion of the information presented by eDB360 comes from Oracle’s Automatic Workload Repository (AWR), and AWR is licensed by Oracle under the Diagnostics Pack. A small part of the output of eDB360 comes from the SQL Monitoring repository, which is part of the Oracle Tuning Pack. This parameter accepts one of 3 values: “T”, “D” or “N”. If you database is licensed under the Oracle Tuning Pack, enter then the value of “T”. If your database is not licensed to use the Oracle Tuning Pack but it is licensed to use the Oracle Diagnostics Pack, enter “D” then. If your site is not licensed on any of these two Oracle Packs, enter “N” then. Be aware that a value of “N” reduces substantially the content and value of the output. Thus the preferred parameter value is “T” (Oracle Tuning Pack).

Sample

# unzip edb360-master.zip
# cd edb360-master
# sqlplus / as sysdba
SQL> @edb360.sql T

Download

EDB360 @ GitHub is available as free software. You can see its readme.txt, license.txt or any other piece of the tool before downloading it. Use this link edb360-master.zip to actually download eDB360 as a compressed file.

Feedback

Please post your feedback about this eDB360 tool at this blog, or send and email directly to the tool author: Carlos Sierra.

Written by Carlos Sierra

July 27, 2014 at 6:14 pm

Posted in AWR, edb360, Health-Checks, Tools

Free script to very quickly and cheaply estimate the size of an index if it were to be rebuilt

with 4 comments

A good friend of mine recently asked me if edb360 included a section showing indexes that would benefit of a rebuild. I replied “not yet” and basically committed to add something. This topic of the needs versus the implications of rebuilding an index has been recently discussed in Richard Foote’s Blog. In my opinion, if you want to know more about indexes, Richard’s blog is one of the first stops. To my surprise and delight, I learned that we can actually use a little trick of the EXPLAIN PLAN FOR command and actually use the CBO to estimate what would be the size of an index if we were to create (or rebuild) it. In this latter blog posting Richard explains and demonstrates how it can be done.

My blog posting today is about encapsulating this cool method to quickly and cheaply estimate the size of an index if it were to be rebuilt, and put it on a free script for the Oracle community to use. So, feel free to use script below, but I need to remind you that before you jump to conclusions that this or that index should be rebuilt, read first about the actual need of doing so. You may want to include in your reading Richard Foote’s numerous postings on this topic, and also a couple of Oracle MOS notes: 989093.1 and 989186.1

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
-- File name:   estimate_index_size.sql
--
-- Purpose:     Reports Indexes with an Actual size > Estimated size for over 1 MB
--
-- Author:      Carlos Sierra
--
-- Version:     2014/07/18
--
-- Description: Script to very quickly and cheaply estimate the size of an index if it
--              were to be rebuilt. It uses EXPLAIN PLAN FOR CREATE INDEX technique.
--              It can be used on a single index, or all the indexes on a table, or
--              a particular application schema, or all application schemas. It does not
--              lock indexes and only updates the plan_table, which is usually a global
--              temporary table.
--
-- Usage:       Connect to SQL*Plus as SYS or DBA account and execute without parameters.
--              It will ask for optional schema owner, table name and index name. If all
--              3 are given null values then it acts on all application schemas. It
--              generates a simple text report with the indexes having an estimated size
--              of at least 1 MB over their actual size.
--
-- Example:     @estimate_index_size.sql
--
-- Notes:       Developed and tested on 11.2.0.3.
--
--              Inspired on blog posts from Richard Foote and Connor MacDonald:
--              http://richardfoote.wordpress.com/2014/04/24/estimate-index-size-with-explain-plan-i-cant-explain/#comment-116966
--              http://connormcdonald.wordpress.com/2012/05/30/index-size/
--
--              If considering index rebuilds based on the output of this script, read
--              first Richard Foote's numerous blog postings about this topic. Bottom
--              line: there are only a few cases where you actually need to manually
--              rebuild an index.
--
--              This method to estimated size of an index is far from perfect, please
--              scrutinize this script before using it. You may also want to read
--              Oracle MOS notes: 989093.1 and 989186.1 on this topic.
--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
SPO estimate_index_size.txt;
UNDEF owner table_name index_name exclusion_list exclusion_list2;
DEF exclusion_list = "('ANONYMOUS','APEX_030200','APEX_040000','APEX_SSO','APPQOSSYS','CTXSYS','DBSNMP','DIP','EXFSYS','FLOWS_FILES','MDSYS','OLAPSYS','ORACLE_OCM','ORDDATA','ORDPLUGINS','ORDSYS','OUTLN','OWBSYS')";
DEF exclusion_list2 = "('SI_INFORMTN_SCHEMA','SQLTXADMIN','SQLTXPLAIN','SYS','SYSMAN','SYSTEM','TRCANLZR','WMSYS','XDB','XS$NULL')";
VAR random1 VARCHAR2(30);
VAR random2 VARCHAR2(30);
EXEC :random1 := DBMS_RANDOM.string('A', 30);
EXEC :random2 := DBMS_RANDOM.string('X', 30);
DELETE plan_table WHERE statement_id IN (:random1, :random2);

SET SERVEROUT ON;
DECLARE
  sql_text CLOB;
BEGIN
  FOR i IN (SELECT idx.owner, idx.index_name
              FROM dba_indexes idx,
                   dba_tables tbl
             WHERE idx.owner = NVL(UPPER(TRIM('&&owner.')), idx.owner) -- optional schema owner name
               AND idx.table_name = NVL(UPPER(TRIM('&&table_name.')), idx.table_name) -- optional table name
               AND idx.index_name = NVL(UPPER(TRIM('&&index_name.')), idx.index_name) -- optional index name
               AND idx.owner NOT IN &&exclusion_list. -- exclude non-application schemas
               AND idx.owner NOT IN &&exclusion_list2. -- exclude more non-application schemas
               AND idx.index_type IN ('NORMAL', 'FUNCTION-BASED NORMAL', 'BITMAP', 'NORMAL/REV') -- exclude domain and lob
               AND idx.status != 'UNUSABLE' -- only valid indexes
               AND idx.temporary = 'N'
               AND tbl.owner = idx.table_owner
               AND tbl.table_name = idx.table_name
               AND tbl.last_analyzed IS NOT NULL -- only tables with statistics
               AND tbl.num_rows > 0 -- only tables with rows as per statistics
               AND tbl.blocks > 128 -- skip small tables
               AND tbl.temporary = 'N')
  LOOP
    BEGIN
      sql_text := 'EXPLAIN PLAN SET STATEMENT_ID = '''||:random1||''' FOR '||REPLACE(DBMS_METADATA.get_ddl('INDEX', i.index_name, i.owner), CHR(10), ' ');
      -- cbo estimates index size based on explain plan for create index ddl
      EXECUTE IMMEDIATE sql_text;
      -- index owner and name do not fit on statement_id, thus using object_owner and object_name, using statement_id as processing state
      DELETE plan_table WHERE statement_id = :random1 AND (other_xml IS NULL OR NVL(DBMS_LOB.instr(other_xml, 'index_size'), 0) = 0);
      UPDATE plan_table SET object_owner = i.owner, object_name = i.index_name, statement_id = :random2 WHERE statement_id = :random1;
    EXCEPTION
      WHEN OTHERS THEN
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(i.owner||'.'||i.index_name||': '||SQLERRM);
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(DBMS_LOB.substr(sql_text));
    END;
  END LOOP;
END;
/
SET SERVEROUT OFF;

WITH
indexes AS (
SELECT pt.object_owner,
       pt.object_name,
       TO_NUMBER(EXTRACTVALUE(VALUE(d), '/info')) estimated_bytes
  FROM plan_table pt,
       TABLE(XMLSEQUENCE(EXTRACT(XMLTYPE(pt.other_xml), '/*/info'))) d
 WHERE pt.statement_id = :random2
   AND pt.other_xml IS NOT NULL -- redundant
   AND DBMS_LOB.instr(pt.other_xml, 'index_size') > 0 -- redundant
   AND EXTRACTVALUE(VALUE(d), '/info/@type') = 'index_size' -- grab index_size type
),
segments AS (
SELECT owner, segment_name, SUM(bytes) actual_bytes
  FROM dba_segments
 WHERE owner = NVL(UPPER(TRIM('&&owner.')), owner) -- optional schema owner name
   AND segment_name = NVL(UPPER(TRIM('&&index_name.')), segment_name) -- optional index name
   AND owner NOT IN &&exclusion_list. -- exclude non-application schemas
   AND owner NOT IN &&exclusion_list2. -- exclude more non-application schemas
   AND segment_type LIKE 'INDEX%'
HAVING SUM(bytes) > POWER(2, 20) -- only indexes with actual size > 1 MB
 GROUP BY
       owner,
       segment_name
),
list_bytes AS (
SELECT (s.actual_bytes - i.estimated_bytes) actual_minus_estimated,
       s.actual_bytes,
       i.estimated_bytes,
       i.object_owner,
       i.object_name
  FROM indexes i,
       segments s
 WHERE i.estimated_bytes > POWER(2, 20) -- only indexes with estimated size > 1 MB
   AND s.owner = i.object_owner
   AND s.segment_name = i.object_name
)
SELECT ROUND(actual_minus_estimated / POWER(2, 20)) actual_minus_estimated,
       ROUND(actual_bytes / POWER(2, 20)) actual_mb,
       ROUND(estimated_bytes / POWER(2, 20)) estimated_mb,
       object_owner owner,
       object_name index_name
  FROM list_bytes
 WHERE actual_minus_estimated > POWER(2, 20) -- only differences > 1 MB
 ORDER BY
       1 DESC,
       object_owner,
       object_name
/

DELETE plan_table WHERE statement_id IN (:random1, :random2);
UNDEF owner table_name index_name exclusion_list exclusion_list2;
SPO OFF;

Written by Carlos Sierra

July 18, 2014 at 9:45 am

Why using SQLTXPLAIN

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Every so often I see on a distribution list a posting that starts like this: “I upgraded my application from database release X to release Y and now many queries are performing poorly, can you tell why?”

As everyone else on a distribution list, my first impulse is to make an educated guess permeated by a prior set of experiences. The intentions are always good, but the process is painful and time consuming. Many of us have seen this kind of question, and many of us have good hunches. Still I think our eagerness to help blinds us a bit. The right thing to do is to step back and analyze the facts, and I mean all the diagnostics supporting the observation.

What is needed to diagnose a SQL Tuning issue?

The list is large, but I will enumerate some of the most important pieces:

  1. SQL Text
  2. Version of the database (before and after upgrade)
  3. Database parameters (before and after)
  4. State of the CBO Statistics (before and after)
  5. Changes on Histograms
  6. Basics about the architecture (CPUs, memory, etc.)
  7. Values of binds if SQL has them
  8. Indexes compare, including state (visible?, usable?)
  9. Execution Plan (before and after)
  10. Plan stability? (Stored Outlines, Profiles, SQL Plan Management)
  11. Performance history as per evidence on AWR or StatsPack
  12. Trace from Event 10053 to understand the CBO
  13. Trace from Event 10046 level 8 or 12 to review Waits
  14. Active Session History (ASH) if 10046 is not available

I could keep adding bullets to the list, but I think you get the point: There are simply too many things to check! And each takes some time to collect. More important, the state of the system changes overtime, so you may need to re-collect the same diagnostics more than once.

SQLTXPLAIN to the rescue

SQLT or SQLTXPLAIN, has been available on MetaLink (now MOS) under note 215187.1 for over a decade. In short, SQLT collects all the diagnostics listed above and a lot more. That is WHY Oracle Support uses it every day. It simply saves a lot of time! So, I always encourage fellow Oracle users to make use of the FREE tool and expedite their own SQL Tuning analysis. When time permits, I do volunteer to help on an analysis. So, if you get to read this, and you want to help yourself while using SQLT but feel intimidated by this little monster, please give it a try and contact me for assistance. If I can help, I will, if I cannot, I will let you know.

Conclusion

It is fun to guess WHY a SQL is not performing as expected, and trying different guesses is educational but very time consuming. If you want to actually find root causes before trying to fix your SQL, you may want to collect relevant diagnostics. SQLT is there to help, and if installing this tool is not something you can do in a short term, consider then SQL Health-Check SQLHC.

 

What is new with EDB360?

with 9 comments

Many things, but most important is that it got bigger and better. This EDB360 free tool provided by Enkitec is maturing over time. Its core function has not changed although, which is to present a 360-degree view of a database (10g or higher).

EDB360 is a nice complement to other tools like Exacheck, Raccheck or Oracheck. It has some additional benefits, like taking a snapshot of a system to then be analyzed offline or simply to preserve this snapshot as a baseline.

Keep in mind that EDB360 does not install anything on the database, nor it changes any data on it. In some cases, where direct access to the database server is not an option, having the capability of executing EDB360 through a SQL*Plus client connection is a big plus.

I use EDB360 as a starting place to perform a whole database health-check.

Since pictures tell more than words, please find below 4. The first two are about the new entries on EDB360 main menu (menu is a tad bigger than what you see in these two pictures, and its content is dynamic). The last two pictures are just a sample of the charts that are now part of EDB360.

EDB360 execution parameters changed from 4 to 6:

  1. Oracle Pack License: If your site has the Tuning Pack, then enter ‘T’, else if your site has the Diagnostics Pack enter ‘D’, else enter ‘N’.
  2. Days of History to consider. If you entered ‘T’ or ‘D’ on first parameter, then specify on 2nd parameter up to how many days of history you want EDB360 to use. By default it uses 31, assuming your AWR history is at least that big.
  3. Do you want HTML Reports? By default it is ‘Y’.
  4. Do you want Text Reports? Defaults to ‘Y’.
  5. Do you want CSV Files? Defaults to ‘Y’.
  6. Do you want Charts? Defaults to ‘Y’.

Once you login into SQL*Plus while on top of the edb360 directory, simply execute script edb360.sql and pass all 6 parameters one by one or all of them inline. For example: @edb360 T 31 Y Y Y Y

EDB360 menu (part 1)

EDB360 Dynamic Menu (part 1)

EDB360 menu (part 2)

EDB360 Dynamic Menu (part 2)

CPU Load per Instance (sample chart)

CPU Load per Instance (sample chart)

ASH Top Modules and Actions for Cluster (sample chart)

ASH Top Modules and Actions for Cluster (sample chart)

If you have downloaded EDB360 before, then I encourage you to download and test the new version. If you have never used it, I hope you find this tool useful.

Written by Carlos Sierra

April 2, 2014 at 10:04 am

How to execute eAdam and eDB360

with one comment

Both eAdam and eDB360 tools are available at the Enkitec web site under the Products tab. You can download a free copy from there; or maybe you were given by an Enkitec consultant a newer version for you to execute. In any case, the question is: “how do I execute these tools?

Executing eAdam

  1. Take the eadam.zip file and unzip it on your server
  2. Navigate to the top eadam directory which contains a readme.txt and a sql subdirectory
  3. Connect into SQL*Plus as SYS, a DBA account, or a user with access to the Data Dictionary views
  4. Execute START sql/eadam_01_xtr.sql using default values for input parameters. Be aware this tool reads from DBA_HIST views, so you can only use it if you have a license for the Oracle Diagnostics or Tuning Packs

    eadam execution sample

    eadam execution sample

Executing eDB360

  1. Take the edb360.zip file and unzip it on your server
  2. Navigate to top edb360 directory which contains a readme.txt, an edb360.sql script, a run_edb360.sh script and a sql subdirectory
  3. Connect into SQL*Plus as SYS, a DBA account, or a user with access to the Data Dictionary views
  4. Execute START edb360.sql passing values to the input parameters. The first one asks about the Oracle License Pack you have, so respond to this with a “T” if you have the Tuning Pack license, with a “D” if you have the Diagnostics Pack or with an “N” if you don’t have any of these two. For the other parameters about the output format just hit enter or pass a “Y”

    edb360 execution sample

    edb360 execution sample

About the Output

Both of these tools generate an output proportional to the size of the selected objects out of the Data Dictionary and Dynamic Views. So it is common for the output to be large, meaning between 100MB and 1 or 2 GB. I strongly recommend to execute these tools from an staging directory with plenty of space. Plan for 10GB, even if the tool end consuming a lot less.

Another consideration is the time these tool take to execute. They extract everything sequentially and on serial execution, so they do not impose a significant load to your system. But since the amount of metadata they extract is large, they may take more than one hour to execute. I have seen cases where they take 2 or 3 hours, so plan accordingly.

The output of each of these two tools is a compressed file. eAdam produces just a set of CSV files, which will be loaded by the requestor into a stand-alone staging Oracle database for data mining and reporting. eDB360 produces HTML, Text and CSV files. The HTML set is the one that is used the most, while the CSV set is used on Excel or similar tool to produce some Charts.

Conclusion

Executing eAdam or eDB360 is easy, but you need access to Data Dictionary views and a large staging area on disk. So before executing these tools, plan on provision space and time.

Written by Carlos Sierra

March 12, 2014 at 10:52 am