Carlos Sierra's Tools and Tips

Tools and Tips for Oracle Performance and SQL Tuning

Archive for the ‘Sharing Cursors’ Category

Scripts to deal with SQL Plan Baselines, SQL Profiles and SQL Patches

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To mitigate SQL performance issues, I do make use of SQL Plan Baselines, SQL Profiles and SQL Patches, on a daily basis. Our environments are single-instance 12.1.0.2 CDBs, with over 2,000 PDBs. Our goal is Execution Plan Stability and consistent performance, over CBO plan flexibility. The CBO does a good job, considering the complexity imposed by current applications design. Nevertheless, some SQL require some help in order to enhance their plan stability.

I have written and shared a set of scripts that simply make the use of a bunch of APIs a lot easier, with better documented actions, and fully consistent within the organization. I have shared with the community these scripts in the past, and I keep them updated as per needs change. All these “CS” scripts are available under the download section on the right column.

Current version of the CS scripts is more like a toolset. You treat them as a whole. All of them call some other script that exists within the cs_internal subdirectory, then I usually navigate to the parent sql directory, and connect into SQL*Plus from there. All these scripts can be easily cloned and/or customized to your specific needs. They are available as “free to use” and “as is”. There is no requirement to keep their heading intact, so you can reverse-engineer them and make them your own if you want. Just keep in mind that I maintain, enhance, and extend this CS toolset every single day; so what you get today is a subset of what you will get tomorrow. If you think an enhancement you need (or a fix) is beneficial to the larger community (and to you), please let me know.

SQL Plan Baselines scripts

With the set of SQL Plan Baselines scripts, you can: 1) create a baseline based on a cursor or a plan stored into AWR; 2) enable and disable baselines; 3) drop baselines; 4) store them into a local staging table; 5) restore them from their local staging table; 6) promote as “fixed” or demote from “fixed”; 7) “zap” them if you have installed “El Zapper” (iod_spm).

Note: “El Zapper” is a PL/SQL package that extends the functionality of SQL Plan Management by automagically creating SQL Plan Baselines based on proven performance of a SQL statement over time, while considering a large number of executions, and a variety of historical plans. Please do not confuse “El Zapper” with auto-evolve of SPM. They are based on two very distinct premises. “El Zapper” also monitors the performance of active SQL Plan Baselines, and during an observation window it may disable a SQL Plan Baseline, if such plan no longer performs as “promised” (according to some thresholds). Most applications do not need “El Zapper”, since the use of SQL Plan Management should be more of an exception than a rule.

SQL Profiles scripts

With the set of SQL Profiles scripts, you can: 1) create a profile based on the outline of a cursor, or from a plan stored into AWR; 2) enable and disable profiles; 3) drop profiles; 4) store them into a local staging table; 5) restore them from their local staging table; 6) transfer them from one location to another (very similar to coe_xfr_sql_profile.sql, but on a more modular way).

Note: Regarding the transfer of a SQL Profile, the concept is simple: 1) on source location generate two plain text scripts, one that contains the SQL text, and a second that includes the Execution Plan (outline); 2) execute these two scripts on a target location, in order to create a SQL Profile there. The beauty of this method is not only that you can easily move Execution Plans between locations, but that you can actually create a SQL Profile getting the SQL Text from SQL_ID “A”, and the Execution Plan from SQL_ID “B”, allowing you to do things like: removing CBO Hints, or using a plan from a similar SQL but not quite the same (e.g. I can tweak a stand-alone cloned version of a SQL statement, and once I get the plan that I need, I associate the SQL Text from the original SQL, with the desired Execution Plan out of the stand-alone customized version of the SQL, after that I create a SQL Plan Baseline and drop the staging SQL Profile).

SQL Patches scripts

With the set of SQL Patches scripts, you can: 1) create a SQL patch based on one or more CBO Hints you provide (e.g.: GATHER_PLAN_STATISTICS MONITOR FIRST_ROWS(1) OPT_PARAM(‘_fix_control’ ‘5922070:OFF’) NO_BIND_AWARE); 2) enable and disable SQL patches; 3) drop SQL patches; 4) store them into a local staging table; 5) restore them from their local staging table.

Note: I use SQL Patches a lot, specially to embed CBO Hints that generate some desirable diagnostics details (and not so much to change plans), such as the ones provided by GATHER_PLAN_STATISTICS and MONITOR. In some cases, after I use the pathfinder tool written by Mauro Pagano, I have to disable a CBO patch (funny thing: I use a SQL Patch to disable a CBO Patch!). I also use a SQL Patch if I need to enable Adaptive Cursor Sharing (ACS) for one SQL (we disabled ACS for one major application). Bear in mind that SQL Plan Baselines, SQL Profiles and SQL Patches happily co-exist, so you can use them together, but I do prefer to use SQL Plan Baselines alone, whenever possible.

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Written by Carlos Sierra

December 15, 2018 at 5:57 am

Purging a cursor in Oracle – revisited

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A few years ago I created a post about “how to flush a cursor out the shared pool“, using DBMS_SHARED_POOL.PURGE. For the most part, this method has helped me to get rid of an entire parent cursor and all child cursors for a given SQL, but more often than not I have found than on 12c this method may not work, leaving active a set of cursors I want to flush.

Script below is an enhanced version, where besides using DBMS_SHARED_POOL.PURGE, we also create a dummy SQL patch, then drop it. This method seems to completely flush parent and child cursors. Why using this method instead?: We are implementing SQL Plan Management (SPM), and we have found that in some cases, some child cursors are still shared several hours after a SQL Plan Baseline (SPB) is created. We could argue a possible bug and pursue as such, but in the meantime my quick and dirty workaround is: whenever I want to flush an individual parent cursor for one SQL, and all of its child cursors, I just execute script below passing SQL_ID.

Anyways, just wanted to share and document this purge_cursor.sql script for those in similar need. I have developed it on 12.1.0.2, and haven’t tested it on lower or higher versions.

-- purge_cursor.sql
DECLARE
 l_name VARCHAR2(64);
 l_sql_text CLOB;
BEGIN
 -- get address, hash_value and sql text
 SELECT address||','||hash_value, sql_fulltext 
 INTO l_name, l_sql_text 
 FROM v$sqlarea 
 WHERE sql_id = '&&sql_id.';
 -- not always does the job
 SYS.DBMS_SHARED_POOL.PURGE (
 name => l_name,
 flag => 'C',
 heaps => 1
 );
 -- create fake sql patch
 SYS.DBMS_SQLDIAG_INTERNAL.I_CREATE_PATCH (
 sql_text => l_sql_text,
 hint_text => 'NULL',
 name => 'purge_&&sql_id.',
 description => 'PURGE CURSOR',
 category => 'DEFAULT',
 validate => TRUE
 );
 -- drop fake sql patch
 SYS.DBMS_SQLDIAG.DROP_SQL_PATCH (
 name => 'purge_&&sql_id.', 
 ignore => TRUE
 );
END;
/

Written by Carlos Sierra

November 22, 2017 at 5:55 am

Poor’s man script to summarize reasons WHY cursors are not shared

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Having a large number of child cursors can affect parsing performance as hinted by Abel Macias on his blog post about Diagnosis of a High Version Count (HVC). On his post, Abel also refers to a note on MOS which includes a script that dives into the reasons WHY our cursors are not getting shared. Then, for deep-dives in this area, I strongly suggest to read his post and use the referenced script provided at MOS.

Besides longer parse times, and potential library cache contention, manifested by some waits (such as on mutex), there is another side effect that may bite us: CBO may produce a different plan when a SQL statement is hard-parsed while creating a new child cursor. This latter side effect can be critical for transactional applications with SLA depending on very short latencies of some queries.

This post is about a poor’s man script, that with no installation whatsoever, it lists an aggregated summary of the reasons why our cursors are not shared, including child cursor counts and distinct SQL_IDs counts for each reason (see sample output below). I had to write such script since in our environments we cannot simply run diagnostics scripts that create objects in the database, such as the one provided by MOS.

   CURSORS    SQL_IDS REASON_NOT_SHARED
---------- ---------- -----------------------------
    226916       7826 ROLL_INVALID_MISMATCH
     29387        105 BIND_EQUIV_FAILURE
     21794       4027 HASH_MATCH_FAILED
     11588       2134 OPTIMIZER_MISMATCH
     11027        413 BIND_LENGTH_UPGRADEABLE
     11008        384 BIND_MISMATCH
     10125       2697 USE_FEEDBACK_STATS
      4540        109 OPTIMIZER_MODE_MISMATCH
      1652         72 PURGED_CURSOR
      1245         81 BIND_UACS_DIFF
      1062        316 LANGUAGE_MISMATCH
       771        103 LOAD_OPTIMIZER_STATS
       500         52 STATS_ROW_MISMATCH
       238         86 MV_QUERY_GEN_MISMATCH
        94          3 MULTI_PX_MISMATCH
        28          4 AUTH_CHECK_MISMATCH
        23          1 INSUFF_PRIVS

Once I get to see some reasons for not sharing, some responsible for a large number of child cursors (and distinct SQL_IDs), then I can search on MOS as Abel suggested. Ideally, if you are interested in plan stability, you may want to reduce the times the CBO is tasked to create a new child cursor (and potentially a new Execution Plan).

In output sample above, top in our list is ROLL_INVALID_MISMATCH, causing 226,916 child cursors in as many as 7,826 SQL statements. This particular reason for not sharing cursors is due to a persistent gathering of schema object statistics with the explicit request to invalidate cursors. Since we want to promote plan stability, we would need to suspend such aggressive gathering of CBO statistics and validate reason ROLL_INVALID_MISMATCH is reduced.

Anyways, free script used is below. Enjoy it!

*** edited *** a new version of the script is now available (below). Thanks to stewashton for his input.

-- sql_shared_cursor.sql
SET HEA OFF LIN 300 NEWP NONE PAGES 0 FEED OFF ECHO OFF VER OFF TRIMS ON TRIM ON TI OFF TIMI OFF SQLBL ON BLO . RECSEP OFF;
SPO all_reasons.sql
SELECT CASE WHEN ROWNUM = 1 THEN '( ' ELSE ', ' END||column_name
  FROM dba_tab_columns
 WHERE table_name = 'V_$SQL_SHARED_CURSOR'
   AND owner = 'SYS'
   AND data_type = 'VARCHAR2'
   AND data_length = 1
/
SPO OFF;
GET all_reasons.sql
I )
I )
I WHERE value = 'Y'
I GROUP BY reason_not_shared
I ORDER BY cursors DESC, sql_ids DESC, reason_not_shared
0 ( value FOR reason_not_shared IN 
0 FROM v$sql_shared_cursor UNPIVOT
0 SELECT COUNT(*) cursors, COUNT(DISTINCT sql_id) sql_ids, reason_not_shared
L
SET HEA ON NEWP 1 PAGES 30
PRO please wait
/
!rm all_reasons.sql

Written by Carlos Sierra

September 1, 2017 at 1:01 pm