Carlos Sierra's Tools and Tips

Tools and Tips for Oracle Performance and SQL Tuning

Posts Tagged ‘SQL Plan Management

Why do you need to gather CBO Statistics?

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As I help a peer with a SQL Tuning engagement, I face the frequent case of: “We do not want to gather CBO schema object statistics because we don’t want our Execution Plans to change”. Well, the bad news is that: not gathering stats only gives you a false sense of safety because your Execution Plans can change anyways. The reason has to do with Predicates referencing values out of range. Typical cases include range of dates, or columns seeded with values out of a sequence (surrogate keys). Most applications use them both. Example: predicate that references last X days of data. Imagine that date column on this predicate actually has statistics with low and high value that are outdated, lets say the high value refers to last time we gather stats (several months old). In such cases, the CBO uses some heuristics starting on 10g, where the cardinality of the Predicate is computed according to range of low/high and how far the value on Predicate is from this low/high range as per the stats. In short, the cardinality changes over time, as the Predicate on the last X days of data changes from one day to the next, and the next, and so on. At some point, the CBO may decide for a different Plan (with lower cost) and the performance of such SQL may indeed change abruptly. Then we scratch our heads and repeat to ourselves: but we did not gather statistics, why did the plan change?

So, if you understand the rationale above, then you would agree with the fact that: not updating CBO schema stats do not offer any real Plan Stability. So, my recommendation is simple: have reasonable CBO statistics and live with the possibility that some Plans will change (they would change anyways, even if you do not gather stats). Keep always in mind this:

The CBO has better chances to produce optimal Plans if we provide reasonable CBO statistics.

Now the good news: if you have some business critical SQL statements and you want them to have stable Plans, then Oracle already provides SQL Plan Management, which is designed exactly for Plan Stability. So, instead of gambling everyday, hoping for your Plans not to change preserving outdated stats, rather face reality, then gather stats, and create SQL Plan Baselines in those few SQL statements that may prove to have an otherwise unstable Plan and are indeed critical for your business. On 10g you can use SQL Profiles instead.

On 10g and 11g, just let the automatic job that gathers CBO schema statistics do its part. In most cases, that is good enough. If you have transient data, for example ETL tasks, then you may want to have the process workflow to gather stats on particular Tables as soon as the data is loaded or transformed and before it is consumed. The trick is simple: “have the stats represent the data at all times”. At the same time, there is no need to over do the stats, just care when the change on the data is sensible.

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Written by Carlos Sierra

November 11, 2014 at 11:58 am

Migrating an Execution Plan using SQL Plan Management

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SQL Plan Management (SPM) has been available since the first release of 11g. As you know SPM is the new technology that provides Plan Stability with some extra Plan Control and Management features. Maria Colgan has done an excellent job documented the “SPM functionality” pretty well in 4 of her popular blog postings:

  1. Creating SQL plan baselines
  2. SPM Aware Optimizer
  3. Evolving SQL Plan Baselines
  4. User Interfaces and Other Features

A question that I often get is: How do I move this good plan from system A into system B? To me, this translates into: How do I migrate an Execution Plan? And if source and target systems are 11g, the answer is: Use SQL Plan Management (SPM).

Migrating a Plan using SPM

Assuming both – source and target systems are on 11g then I suggest one of the two approaches below. If the source is 10g and target is 11g, then the 2nd approach below would work. In both cases the objective is to create a SQL Plan Baseline (SPB) into the target system out of a known plan from the source system.

Option 1: Create SPB on source then migrate SPB into target

Steps:

  1. Create SQL Plan Baseline (SPB) in Source
    1. From Memory; or
    2. From AWR (requires Diagnostics Pack license)
  2. Package & Export SPB from Source
  3. Import & Restore SPB into Target

Pros: Simple

Cons: Generates a SPB in Source system

Option 2: Create SQL Tuning Set (STS) on source, migrate STS into target, promote STS into SPB in target

Steps:

  1. Create SQL Tuning Set (STS) in Source (requires Tuning Pack license)
    1. From Memory; or
    2. From AWR (requires Diagnostics Pack license)
  2. Package & Export STS from Source
  3. Import & Restore STS into Target
  4. Create SPB from STS in Target

Pros: No SPB is created in Source system

Cons: Requires license for SQL Tuning Pack

How SQLTXPLAIN (SQLT) can help?

SQLT has been generating for quite some time a STS for each Plan Hash Value (PHV) of the SQL being analyzed. This STS for each PHV created on the source system is also stored inside the SQLT repository and included in the export of this SQLT repository. By doing this every time, options 1 and 2 above are simplified. If we want to promote a Plan into a SPB in source system we only have to execute an API that takes the Plan from the STS and creates the SPB. The dynamic readme included with SQLT has the exact command. And if we want to create a SPB on a target system having a SQLT from a source system, we have to restore the SQLT repository into the target system, then restore the STS out of the SQLT repository, and last create the SPB out of the STS. All these steps are clearly documented in the SQLT dynamic readme, including exact commands. There is one caveat although: you need SQLT in source and restore its repository in target…

Stand-alone scripts to Migrate a Plan using SPM

Options 1 and 2 above list the steps to take a plan from a source system and implement with it a SPB into a target system. The questions is: How exactly do I perform each of the steps? Yes, there are APIs for each step, but some are a bit difficult to use. That is WHY I have created a set of scripts that pretty much facilitate each of the steps. No magic here, only some time savings. If you want to use these scripts, look for SQLT directory sqlt/utl/spm, which will be available with SQLT 11.4.5.8 on May 10, 2013. If you need these scripts before May 10, then please send me an email or post a comment here.

Written by Carlos Sierra

May 2, 2013 at 8:02 am